The Organic Intensity of Caza

Caza, the pseudonym of Philippe Cazaumayou, also known as Philippe Caza, along with Richard Corben, Moebius, and Philippe Druillet, introduced me to amazing new worlds as an adolescent reading Heavy Metal magazine. They all had imaginations that seemed somehow freer than I thought possible. Like putting these things down on paper couldn’t possibly be okay. Caza, in particular, has a style that just feels alien: bulbous, dense, fluid, dark, intense and, at the same time, elegant.

He wasn’t as prolific as some of his contemporaries owing to his elaborate, pointillist style (which he later toned down – for obvious reasons) but his ideas really set him apart. Caza created worlds that felt dark and dangerous, surreal and sexual, like an acid trip that was on the verge of going bad. His women were alien or, at least, looked and felt alien. His men were rarely the cookie-cutter fantasy heroes, musclebound and in charge, but were more sympathetic and usually just as lost as the reader was in their worlds.

Caza was strange in the best possible way. An iconoclast in the world of science fiction and fantasy art. His work didn’t make our shores often and, as a result, always felt special.

© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza
© Caza

All artwork © Philippe Caza.